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June Meeting
Monday, June 21
June Meeting
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Online Zoom meeting - see registration link
Our June meeting will be held virtually using Zoom, in conjunction with the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh.  Karen Stanbury will present "The Everleigh Sisters: A Case Study in Conflict Resolution."
 
Meet Ada and Minna---Chicago's most famous  sisters who operated the ultra-luxurious bordello known as the  Everleigh Club from 1900 until it was closed by mayoral order in 1911. Learn to sort fact from fiction as we study their fabricated lives from birth to death. 
 
Karen Stanbary, MA, CG, holds a Master’s Degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Chicago. She specializes in complex problem-solving using genetic and documentary sources and the Genealogical Proof Standard. Karen’s regional specialties include Midwestern United States, Chicago, and Mexico. She is bilingual (Spanish). She is a coordinator and faculty member at the genealogical institutes—GRIP, IGHR, and SLIG. The National Genealogical Society honored her with the NGSQ Award for Excellence for her complex evidence case study incorporating traditional documentary research and autosomal DNA analysis in the June 2016 issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly. She holds the credential Certified Genealogist from the Board for Certification of Genealogists where she serves as a Trustee and chair of the DNA Standing Committee. (GRIP June 2021 and July 2021). 
 
 
Please click HERE to register for this meeting; you will receive an email message containing links to use for joining the June 21st Zoom meeting and for downloading the handout.



July Meeting
Monday, July 12
July Meeting
7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Online Zoom meeting - see registration link
Our July meeting will be held virtually using Zoom, in conjunction with the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh. Ari Wilkins will present "Friends of Friends: Quakers and African American Communities."
 
Well-known for their anti-slavery views, Quakers began to migrate to the slave-free territories in the 19th century. As they migrated out of the South, Quakers emancipated and traveled with their newly freed slaves. Once settled, the sect continued their abolitionist cause by supporting the Underground Railroad – transporting runaway slaves to free states. In turn, free blacks established their own settlements, while still maintaining ties with the Quaker community.
 
Ari Wilkins, a graduate of Louisiana State University, has been actively researching family history since 1998. Ms. Wilkins has spoken nationally at the National Genealogical Society, Federation of Genealogical Societies, Texas State Genealogical Society, Ohio Genealogical Society, Institute of Genealogical and Historical Research, Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy, American Library Association, RootsTech, and a multitude of local societies.  Ari has been a Library Associate at Dallas Public Library since 2007.  She teaches a series of basic research classes using popular genealogical websites. She specializes in African American research. (GRIP July 2021). 
 
Please note that our July meeting will be held on July 12th, the second Monday of the month, as opposed to our normally scheduled third Monday of the month.
 
Please click HERE to register for this meeting; you will receive an email containing the link for joining the July 12th Zoom meeting.